Skip to main content

Quiet lanes

Quiet lanes are a network of rural roads where minimal traffic calming measures are used to enable all road users to ‘share with care’.​

  • Travel is easier for cyclists, walkers, horse riders and those in wheelchairs
  • Drivers are encouraged to travel at slower speeds
  • Everyone using the lanes must consider their behaviour towards other users and ‘share with care’
  • Local authorities, interest groups and local communities develop a partnership to establish a local consensus about local travel
  • Research is carried out into how people travel
  • Communities are encouraged to ‘own’ the lane
  • People show respect for the local environment and its character and landscape is managed and conserved
  • Links with other routes may be developed to create local networks for communities to use.

What quiet lanes are not

  • Roads closed to motor vehicles, although some may be for access only or make restrictions on the type of vehicle able to use them
  • Roads where non-motorised transport has priority. Nobody has priority.
  • Just about speed limits
  • Urban traffic calming measures
  • Attempts to deny access to cars
  • Anti-car
  • Designed to restrict choice. Rather they widen it, so that people can use and enjoy a variety of means of travel
  • An attempt to disrupt the economic life of the countryside or prevent delivery vans, farm machinery and emergency vehicles from going about their business.

What do they look like?

Urban street furniture would look out of place in a rural setting. Instead, we might:

  • Make changes to roads and verges
  • Use soft landscaping
  • Remove existing road signs
  • Introduce local waymarking
  • Use different surface treatments
  • Provide passing bays

How would the project affect the local area?

We will take care to retain and enhance the local character. We will also consult the local community throughout the development process about what resources we should use.

Through traffic must be kept on major roads. We might put lower speed limits in place to calm traffic through villages. We would have to plan any speed management measures carefully with the local police and support them through public awareness campaigns and local community participation.

Is there anything wrong with this page?