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No entry and one-way streets

Many streets suffer from ‘rat-running’ or high volumes of traffic. Creating one-way streets is one way of solving this problem. However, there are also disadvantages to altering the direction of traffic flow in this way.

Residents should be aware that the following may occur:

  • Some through traffic will simply be diverted onto other, less suitable streets
  • The new one-way street may attract more traffic, albeit in the remaining direction
  • Residents may have to access their street by an alternative, and less convenient, route, which may involve the use of other neighbouring streets
  • Traffic speeds may increase due to drivers’ perception that there is no on-coming traffic
  • Without physical traffic calming, there may be an increase in accidents and their severity
  • Some short sections of one-way street are likely to be contravened by drivers – which may require police enforcement.

Creating a one-way street

To make a one-way street legal, the council has to make a Traffic Regulation Order (TRO). A TRO is a legal process which involves the full statutory consultation procedure and can be a lengthy and resource-intensive process.

The council is unlikely to create a one-way street in isolation, due to the costs and resources required to carry out such a scheme. It is much more likely that it will consider changing the direction of traffic on a street as part of a wider review of traffic management in an area. Furthermore, the risk of increasing accidents in one-way streets means that this measure is not usually considered without traffic calming, which would also increase implementation costs significantly.

Contra-flow bus and cycle lanes

If a one-way street is proposed, an exemption for pedal cyclists will be considered. Contra-flow bus and cycle lanes may also be considered, where appropriate. ‚Äč

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