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South Gloucestershire Tree Week

Tree Week 23 Nov - 1 Dec 2019

We are holding our first Tree Week, between 23 November and 1 December 2019, to raise awareness of the benefits of trees and encourage everyone to help us double the tree cover in South Gloucestershire by 2030.

We will be holding walks, talks and several planting events as well as giving a tree to members of our staff who sign up to plant one at home.

During the week, which will run in tandem with National Tree Week, we will be:

  • working with children and adults who helped us to declare a climate emergency in July 2019
  • working with town and parish councils with the aim of planting 1,000 trees over the 2019 winter planting season
  • offering trees to all council staff to plant at home
  • planting an additional 5,000 trees on council-owned land in six parishes during the winter planting season.

Tree Week is the beginning of our tree planting work and there will be many more events to follow in the future.

A climate emergency

In July 2019, the council declared a climate emergency and has pledged to provide the leadership to enable South Gloucestershire to become carbon neutral by 2030. To help combat and adapt to climate change, South Gloucestershire needs to double its tree cover by 2030.

We do not own enough land to reach our tree planting requirements, therefore, as well as planting as many trees on our own land as possible we need to find innovative ways to increase tree planting across the area.

Public events during Tree Week

  • Saturday 23 November, 10.30am-12.30pm: Community Tree Planting event at Avon Valley Woodlands Local Nature Reserve. Book your place online.
  • Saturday 30 November at 10am: Join Avon Wildlife Trust for a workday at Wapley Bushes Nature Reserve Find out more here.

The event planned for Sunday 1 December at Lower Woods Nature Reserve, has unfortunately had to be cancelled due to unforeseen circumstances.

Right tree, right place

Are you thinking of planting a tree in your garden?

Key things to consider:

  • choose an appropriate tree species with a size at maturity that will be in keeping with its surroundings
  • if there isn’t space available for a large tree then plant a smaller species
  • shrubs and smaller trees will be appropriate for most small to medium sized gardens in the UK

What variety?

Larger trees such as oak, sycamore, beech, sweet chestnut for example need a considerable amount of space and should be planted at a significant distance from a dwelling.

Shrubs and smaller trees should be planted away from any dwelling and back from the boundary of the property. Examples include: Dogrose, hawthorn, hazel, crab apple, dogwood, wild cherry, rowan, holly and goat willow.

For more information on how to plant trees visit the Woodland Trust website. 

To find out more about what we are doing to respond to the climate emergency and our tree planting plans please email Environmental.Policy@southglos.gov.uk

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